How to sort a list of numbers

It’s funny how some of the simplest questions you can think of actually have interesting and nontrivial answers.

Take this question, for instance. If I hand you a list of N numbers, how can you quickly sort this list from smallest to largest? Suppose that you are only capable of sorting two numbers at a time.

You might immediately think of some obvious ways to solve this problem. For instance, you could just start at the beginning of the list and repeatedly traverse it, swapping numbers if they’re in the wrong order. This will guarantee that each pass-through, the largest number out of those not yet sorted will “bubble up” to the top. This algorithm is called Bubble Sort.

The problem is that for a sizable list, this will take a long long time. On average, for a list of size N, Bubble Sort takes O(N^2) steps to finish sorting. Can you think of a faster algorithm?

It turns out that we can go much faster with some clever algorithms – from O(N^2) to O(N logN). If you have a little time to burn, here are some great basic videos describing and visualizing different sorting techniques:

Comparisons of Merge, Quick, Heap, Bubble and Insertion Sort

Visualizations

Beautiful visualization of Bubble, Shell, and Quick Sort

(I’d be interested to know why the visualization of Bubble Sort in the final frame gave a curve of unsorted values that looked roughly logarithmic)

Visualization of 9 sorting algorithms

Auditory presentation of 15 sorting algorithms

Bonus clip…

Cool proof of the equivalence of Selection Sort and Insertion Sort

Searching a list

By the way, how about if you have a sorted list and want to find a particular value in it? If we’re being dumb, we could just ignore the fact that our list came pre-sorted and search through every element on the list in order. We’d find our value in O(N). We can go much faster by just starting in the middle of our list, looking at the size of the middle value to determine which half of the list to look at next, and then repeating with the appropriate half of the list. This is called binary search and takes O(logN), a massive speedup.

Now, let’s look back at the problem of finding a particular value in an unsorted list. Can we think of any techniques to accomplish this more quickly than O(N)?

No. Try as you might, as long as the list has no structure for you to exploit, your optimal performance will be limited to O(N).

Or so everybody thought until quantum mechanics showed up and blew our minds.

It turns out that a quantum computer would be able to solve this exact problem – searching through an unsorted list – in only O(√N) steps! 

This should seem impossible to you. If a friend hands you a random jumbled list of 10,000 names and asks you to locate one particular name on the list, you’re going to end up looking through 5,000 names on average. There’s no clever trick you can use to speed up the process. Except that quantum mechanics says you’re wrong! In fact, if you were a quantum computer, you’d only have to search through ~100 names to find your name.

This quantum algorithm is called Grover’s algorithm, and I want to write up a future post about it. But that’s not even the coolest part! It turns out that if a non-local hidden variable interpretation of quantum mechanics is correct, then a quantum computer could search an N-item database in O(∛N)! You can imagine the triumphal feeling of the hidden variables people if one day they managed to build a quantum computer that simultaneously proved them right and broke the record for search algorithm speed!

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